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NIHHIS News

2020 Heat Watch Campaigns Progressing, Innovating
Thea Kindschuh

2020 Heat Watch Campaigns Progressing, Innovating

As our thirteen Heat Watch campaign cities progress through the campaign planning steps (color corresponds with flowchart phase), local organizers are creatively adapting the Heat Watch process. We've compiled highlights from some campaigns below. 

El Paso, TX & Las Cruces, NM

These two cities teamed up to conduct their heat mapping assessments on the same day. The Las Cruces team recruited university students through their partnership with New Mexico State University, while El Paso organizers reached their many volunteers through the nearby University of Texas El Paso campus. 

Houston, TX

With an especially large mapping area (over 300 square miles!), the Houston/Harris County team created its own website to recruit volunteers. Available in both Spanish and English, this user-friendly website promotes the purpose of the heat mapping campaign, the partners involved, media stories and provides the many relevant documents to volunteers.

Miami, FL

Thunderstorms and rains aused the Miami campaign to shift dates and adapt. The National Weather Service Miami/ South Florida generously provided campaign conditions for each mapping hour of potential campaign days, and coordinators at the City of Miami and non-profit partner Catalyst Miami communicated updates with volunteers using the free messaging platform, WhatsApp.

Austin, TX

To enhance the design of campaign routes, the Austin team is using a data-driven approach and gathering priority areas and points of interest into an interactive web-map. Data layers include the locations of mobile home parks, affordable housing units, cooling centers, transit stops and parks, as well as information on social vulnerability, heat risk, and life expectancy. 

Cincinnati, OH

A handful of participants in Cincinnati will traverse their campaign routes from behind the wheel of several electric vehicles, as part of a coordinated effort with EV Cincy and the Cincinnati EV Car Club. These initiatives aim to promote education and use of electric vehicles and will help to create a low carbon footprint for Cincinnati’s campaign.

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Eight cities slated to run Urban Heat Island mapping campaigns in summer 2019 21 June 2019

Eight cities slated to run Urban Heat Island mapping campaigns in summer 2019

Community organizers in eight U.S. cities have been offered support for UHI mapping campaigns through the National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) and CPO’s Communication, Education, and Engagement Division.

Ready for summer heat? Study finds new primary driver of extreme Texas heat waves 28 June 2018

Ready for summer heat? Study finds new primary driver of extreme Texas heat waves

A team of scientists found that a strengthened change in ocean temperatures from west to east (or gradient) in the tropical Pacific during the preceding winter is the main driver of more frequent heat waves in Texas. 

Climate Resilience Toolkit Publishes New Case Study on Heat Illness Early Warning in the Carolinas 16 March 2018

Climate Resilience Toolkit Publishes New Case Study on Heat Illness Early Warning in the Carolinas

Developing an Early Warning System to Prevent Heat Illness

Residents of the Carolinas are familiar with hot summers, but in some areas excessive heat events bring a higher risk for heat-related illness—and even death. A new tool can help local communities get ahead of heat events so they can reduce risk for their residents.

WaPo: Heat wave creates health hazard in southwestern US 19 June 2017

WaPo: Heat wave creates health hazard in southwestern US

By Clarice Silber and Josh Hoffner | AP

PHOENIX — The southwestern U.S. is about to feel the wrath of a punishing heat wave that includes a forecast of 120 degrees (48.8 Celsius) in Phoenix — a temperature not seen in the desert city in more than 20 years.

The broiling temperatures will also be felt in Las Vegas and Southern California, creating a public health hazard. Rising temps are being closely watched by everyone from airline pilots and emergency room doctors to power grid managers and mountain cities unaccustomed to heat waves.

Even cities accustomed to dealing with 110-degree (43-Celsius) days are grappling with the new problems that arise from 120 degrees (48.8 Celsius).

NOAA Releases Summer Climate Outlook for 2017 6 June 2017

NOAA Releases Summer Climate Outlook for 2017

only the great plains may be spared from above average temperatures

Schools are letting out, Memorial Day is nearly here, and for many Americans that means  the unofficial start of summer. And if it's summer, then it 's time to start paying attention to the risk of extreme heat. According to NOAA’s summer outlook, most of the United States is favored to have a hotter than average summer in 2017. Only in the Great Plains do forecasters think the chances for a cool or a normal summer are equal to the chances of a hot summer. Everywhere else—from Alaska to southern California, and from Maine to Texas—odds are tilted toward well above average warmth. The absolute highest chances for a much warmer than usual summer are in Hawaii. (see the large version of the map below for Hawaii and Alaska.

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About Us

The NIHHIS is an integrated system that builds understanding of the problem of extreme heat, defines demand for climate services that enhance societal resilience, develops science-based products and services from a sustained climate science research program, and improves capacity, communication, and societal understanding of the problem in order to reduce morbidity and mortality due to extreme heat. The NIHHIS is a jointly developed system by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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