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NIHHIS News

GHHIN hosts webinar on Dialogues on Heat in the City and in the Workplace
Margaret Orr
/ Categories: NIHHIS, CPO NIHHIS Event, News

GHHIN hosts webinar on Dialogues on Heat in the City and in the Workplace

On July 28th and 29th, the Global Heat Health Information Network (GHHIN) hosted discussions on the urgent challenges of extreme heat in urban areas and in occupational settings. The discussions were moderated by Thomson Reuters reporters, and featured experts from government, academia, and industry.

The Heat in the City dialogue showcased urban innovations in heat health. Speakers presented the state of the practice of increasing resilience to extreme heat in cities across the world, from their diverse perspectives of governance, planning, design, and vulnerable populations. This was followed by a facilitated panel discussion, with opportunities for audience engagement.

The Heat in the Workplace dialogue focused on recent developments in occupational heat health. Speakers gave short presentations on the state of the science, new research outcomes into often overlooked worker populations, and practical interventions into occupational heat health in Europe, Central America and Vietnam. This was  followed by a facilitated panel discussion, with opportunities for audience engagement.

The thematic areas of urban and occupational health were identified during the First Global Forum on Heat and Health, which took place in Hong Kong in 2019. These dialogues were being held in lieu of the planned Second Global Forum on Heat and Health, which was to take place in Copenhagen. The Second Global Forum will take place in the summer of 2021.

The Global Heat Health Information Network (GHHIN) is a forum that brings together researchers and practitioners from around the world who focus on reducing the health risks of extreme heat. It was developed to integrate with and scale up the U.S. National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS), led by NOAA’s Climate Program Office and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, through a shared framework for organizing outstanding research needs and actions.

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CPO Funds University of Vermont Extreme Heat Project 16 August 2021

CPO Funds University of Vermont Extreme Heat Project

The project will build on outcomes from NOAA's community-led field campaigns, which have helped engage the Burlington community and have produced critical hyperlocal temperature information. But cities, and Vermont's smaller cities and communities in particular, need more tools and resources to help them determine the most effective and efficient solutions tailored to their needs.  

CEE's John Coggin Speaks to DC-area Media about Urban Heat Island Mapping Campaign 27 July 2021

CEE's John Coggin Speaks to DC-area Media about Urban Heat Island Mapping Campaign

Coggin spoke about the importance of the campaign in an interview with NBC4 as he volunteered with the Arlington County, Virginia community in their efforts to map urban heat.

Webinar Series - Urban Heat Island Solutions Across the US 22 July 2021

Webinar Series - Urban Heat Island Solutions Across the US

Learning from the NIHHIS UHI Community of Practice

Image from Wikipedia
The National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) and its partners are hosting a webinar series to feature community case studies on what happens after Urban Heat Island mapping campaigns are conducted. The first webinar of the series, “Exploring the Heat Hazard”, will take place on July 29th at 2PM EDT and will highlight the range of experience of heat across the US. Key discussions will include a variety of methods and approaches to measure heat, from satellites, mobile transects, stationary observations, to wearable sensors. Speakers for this event include Jen Runkle (NC State University), Cameron Lee (Kent State University), and Brian Garcia (Warning Coordination Meteorologist, NOAA/NWS), with moderation by Noura Randle (NOAA/CPO). Learn more about the webinars and register for the webinar series here.

NOAA’s Climate Program Office awards over $1 million to improve climate information, services for extreme heat resilience 29 June 2021

NOAA’s Climate Program Office awards over $1 million to improve climate information, services for extreme heat resilience

Five new projects will build on outcomes from NOAA’s community-led urban heat mapping campaigns

The projects will support decision making in city neighborhoods grappling with inequitably distributed impacts from the deadliest weather-related risk in the United States—extreme heat. 

Upcoming Webinar: What Happens When You Go “Hyperlocal”? The Legacy of Inequitable Heat Exposure in U.S. Cities 18 May 2021

Upcoming Webinar: What Happens When You Go “Hyperlocal”? The Legacy of Inequitable Heat Exposure in U.S. Cities

The webinar will explore how increasing community engagement in both understanding and measuring urban heat through the use of a novel participatory research campaign framework can lead to climate action efficacy in US cities.

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NIHHIS is an integrated information system that builds understanding of the problem of extreme heat, defines demand for climate services that enhance societal resilience, develops science-based products and services from a sustained climate science research program, and improves capacity, communication, and societal understanding of the problem in order to reduce morbidity and mortality due to extreme heat.  NIHHIS is a jointly developed system by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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