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Participating agencies:   ASPR   |  CDC   |  EPA   |  FEMA   |  NIOSH   |  NOAA   |  OSHA   |  SAMHSA   

Thank you for attending the National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) National Meeting!

The video recordings and PowerPoint slides are available to view below. 

The NIHHIS National Meeting took place from April 26-28, 2022. 

The first NIHHIS National Meeting was held virtually April 26-28, 2022. This virtual/online meeting was designed to bring together multiple stakeholders (federal agencies, state and local government, private and public partners, community leaders) to:

  • Learn about and leverage heat and health activities, opportunities, and resources
  • Expand and strengthen partnerships and networks, and 
  • Foster a shared vision and path forward for equitable, heat resilient communities

View the Agenda

Contact NIHHIS

Email: nihhis@noaa.gov

About NIHHIS 

NIHHIS is an integrated system that builds understanding of the problem of extreme heat, defines demand for climate services that enhance societal resilience, develops science-based products and services from a sustained climate science research program, and improves capacity, communication, and societal understanding of the problem in order to reduce morbidity and mortality due to extreme heat. NIHHIS is a jointly developed system by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.


The NIHHIS National Meeting Steering Committee is comprised of leadership from: CDC, EPA, FEMA, HHS, NOAA, NIOSH, OSHA, SAMHSA, and the VA. 

 

Who Should Come to the NIHHIS National Meeting?

The NIHHIS National Meeting is open to anyone who is working to address the health impacts of extreme heat. This includes, but is not limited to, federal agencies who are part of NIHHIS and the White House Interagency Working Group on Extreme Heat, state and local governments and organizations (esp. Chief Resilience Officers, city planners, public health officials), Tribal officials, community-based organizations, cities that are part of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) mapping campaigns, international partners, private and public sector NIHHIS partners, organizations that support NIHHIS legislation, and heat and health researchers and academics. 

What are the Themes of the NIHHIS National Meeting?

While the meeting will be covering many different topic areas surrounding heat and health, the thematic areas of the conference are: Defining the Problem (day 1), Building Equitable Community Resilience (day 2), and Building Equitable Human Resilience (day 3). 

The sessions of the NIHHIS National Meeting were recorded and posted on our website and Youtube page

Agenda

Download Agenda (pdf) 

Videos: Day One  |  Day Two  |  Day Three


Tuesday, April 26th, 2022 (12:30 PM – 5:00 PM EDT) | Video

All sessions conducted online via Zoom

 

The Heat Health Problem: Defining the Problem

11:00 – 12:00

Speaker and panelist technical checks (microphone, video, connectivity)

12:25-12:30

Technical Moderator provides overview of platform and logistics

12:30- 12:50

Welcome and Opening Remarks from NIHHIS Agency Leadership
The importance of nationally addressing the Heat Health problem

Dr. Richard Spinrad, NOAA Administrator

Dr. Rochelle Walensky, CDC Director 

12:50 – 1:00

Overview of Conference Agenda
Review of conference structure and opportunities to engage with the NIHHIS interagency leads. 

Juli Trtanj, NOAA Climate Program Office 

Paul Schramm, HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Climate and Health Program

Kimberly McMahon, NOAA National Weather Service

1:00 –1:45

What is the Nature of the Heat Health Problem?
Presentations
How does heat affect the health of the American people and US interests at home and abroad? Why is there a heat problem? How are people impacted by heat? Why are people dying from heat & who is dying from heat? What are the health-related economic costs of heat?

Moderator:

Kurt Shickman, Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center

Presentations:

1. Why is there a heat problem? | Presentation

Dr. Rachel Licker, Union of Concerned Scientists 

2. How are people impacted by heat? | Presentation 

Juanita Constible, Natural Resources Defense Council 

3. Why are people dying from heat, and who is dying from heat? | Presentation 

Dr. Georges C. Benjamin, American Public Health Association 

4. What are the health-related economic costs of heat? | Presentation

Owen Gow, Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center  

1:45 – 2:00

Break

2:00-2:15

New Heat Legislation
Congressional Representative shares new heat legislation (Preventing HEAT Illness and Deaths Act- 2021) that authorizes NIHHIS to prepare the nation for the threats of extreme heat and protect communities that are disproportionately impacted.

Senator Edward Markey, D-MA

2:15 – 2:25

NIHHIS Retrospective
Brief presentation of retrospective of NIHHIS accomplishments and initiatives underway

2:25 – 3:30

Community Perspectives: Roundtable discussion with state and local partners to understand current priorities and challenges in heat resilience planning.
Moderated panel discussion and Q&A
How are we understanding the problem? How are we predicting the problem? How are we responding to the problem? What do you need to better manage the heat problem?

Moderator:

Dr. Ladd Keith, University of Arizona | Presentation 

Panelists:

Marc Coudert, City of Austin Office of Sustainability

Erin Garnaas-Holmes, DC Department of Energy and Environment

Dr. Shasta Gaughen, Pala Band of Mission Indians

Jane Gilbert, Chief Heat Officer, Miami-Dade County

Ben Money, National Association for Community Health Centers

3:30 – 4:00

Keynote speakers on the Administration’s heat priorities

Introduction: Dr. Wayne Higgins ,NOAA Climate Program Office 

David Hayes, Special Assistant to the President for Climate Policy

Monica P. Medina, Assistant Secretary for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs

Closeout for the day Review of tomorrow’s agenda exploring the way forward

4:00 – 5:00

Networking Session: Via Wonder Platform

Hosted by the NIHHIS National Steering Committee

The networking event will feature discussion areas by thematic topics that participants can join to foster conversation and collaboration. Thematic areas include: urban heat islands, rural heat, maternal and child heat and health, communicating heat and health, social and economic costs of heat, congressional outreach, environmental justice, extreme heat and disasters, and talk to NIHHIS. Participants will be able to have 1:1 conversations with other participants, as well as conversations with larger groups within the platform. 

The link to the Wonder platform will be sent to attendees who register for the NIHHIS National Meeting. 

Wednesday, April 27th, 2022 (12:30 PM– 5:00 PM EDT) | Video

The Heat Health Problem: Building Equitable Community Resilience

11:00 – 12:00

Speaker and panelist technical checks (microphone, video, connectivity)

12:00 – 12:30

Coffee Discussion (optional mix-and-mingle opportunity) via Zoom for Gov

Discussion on indicators for heat health risk and solutions

Hosted by the Climate Change and Human Health Group (CCHHG) Heat Indicators Group

With exposure to extreme heat increasing in intensity and frequency, there is a critical need to assemble and track data on heat exposure and health impacts that can drive equitable risk reduction solutions. In this coffee discussion, we will share a list of proposed indicators from various US government agencies and solicit feedback from participants in the NIHHIS National Meeting.

To join this coffee discussion, use the Zoom link you received after registering for the NIHHIS National Meeting. 

12:30- 12:50

Welcome and recap of April 26th agenda
Review agenda focused on building community resilience

Keynote: NIHHIS Partner Agency Leadership

Janet McCabe, Deputy Administrator, EPA

Victoria Salinas, Associate Administrator for Resilience, FEMA

12:50 – 1:30

Heat action plans for the 21st century - preparing for heat waves in a changing climate.
Moderated discussion with two speakers and Q&A
What can we do before, during, and after heat events? How do we protect communities during heat events? From a local/city perspective, what can we do? What resources, tools are available? How do we manage risks?

Moderator:

Nick Shufro, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Federal Insurance & Mitigation Administration 

Presentations:

1. Case Study: Lessons learned from the Pacific Northwest heat dome | Presentation 

Brendon Haggerty, Multnomah County Health Department

2. Heat Action Plans

Dr. Kristie Ebi, University of Washington

3. Multi-hazard Mitigation Plans | Presentation 

Barbara Meadows, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) 

1:30 - 3:00

How can we better prepare for and manage cascading impacts with heat?
Two moderated panels and open engagement
What are federal agencies doing? What are state and local communities doing on-the-ground, and what is or is not working? How do we work at federal and state level better?

Moderator:

Dr. Thomas Osborne, US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

Opening Presentation:

Vicki Arroyo, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Presenters:

Kristen Finne, HHS Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) | Presentation 

Laura Fox, Arizona Department of Health Services & Maricopa County Department of Public Health  | Presentation 

Maggie Jarry, HHS Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Eric Chaney, DOT National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) | Presentation 

Dr. Evan Mallen, Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Brian Stone, Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Erik Svendsen, HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) | Presentation

3:00-3:15

Break

3:15-4:00

How can we better communicate the heat risk?
Moderated panel discussion and Q&A
How do we handle heat communications now? What is here and what is upcoming? How do we communicate the risk of heat across all timescales?

Moderator:

Morgan Zabow, NOAA Climate Program Office 

Presenters:

Dr. Danielle Nagele, NOAA National Weather Service | Presentation 

Dr. John Balbus, HHS Office of Climate Change and Health Equity

Hunter Jones, NOAA Climate Program Office | Presentation 

Bernadette Woods Placky, Climate Central | Presentation 

4:00- 4:15

Keynote closing | Presentation 

Dr. Joy Shumake-Guillemot, WHO/WMO Climate and Health Joint Office

Closeout for the day
Review of tomorrow’s agenda

4:15 – 5:00

Networking Session Via Wonder Platform

Hosted by ASTHO, GEO Health Community of Practice, and NACCHO

Participants will be encouraged to ASTHO, NACCHO, and the GEO Health Community of Practice members about heat and health from their perspectives representing city, state, county, territorial, and international health communities. Participants will be able to have 1:1 conversations with other participants, as well as conversations with larger groups within the platform. 

The link to the Wonder platform will be sent to attendees who register for the NIHHIS National Meeting. 

Thursday, April 28th, 2022 (12:30 PM– 4:30 PM EDT) | Video

The Heat Health Problem: Building Equitable Human Resilience

11:00 – 12:00

Speaker and panelist technical checks (microphone, video, connectivity)

12:00-12:30

Coffee Discussion (optional mix-and-mingle opportunity) via Zoom for Gov

Discussion on International Heat and Health work 

Hosted by the Global Heat Health Information Network (GHHIN)

We invite you to join members of the Global Heat Health Information Network to discuss international heat and health. The session will be moderated by members of GHHIN and focus on how GHHIN and other international institutions and organizations are addressing heat health, with hopes of providing resources and strengthening the international network on heat and health. 

To join this coffee discussion, use the Zoom link you received after registering for the NIHHIS National Meeting. 

12:30 – 12:50

Overview of Conference Agenda
Review of conference structure and opportunities to engage.

Keynote: NIHHIS Partner Agency Leadership

Douglas L. Parker, Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA

12:50 - 1:35

How can we provide heat safe housing for all?
Moderated panel of federal, local, and private sector representatives and Q&A
How can we make sure that people can safely shelter at home? How can everyone have the resources and ability to stay cool during heat events? What is happening at both rural and city levels? How are we reaching disproportionately impacted populations? How can we make sure that people have heat-safe housing before, during, and after heat events?

Moderator:

Dr. Shubhayu Saha, HHS Office of Climate Change and Health Equity

Panelists:

Dr. Janice Barnes, Climate Adaptation Partners

Dr. David Hondula, Arizona State University & City of Phoenix

Tom Hucker, Montgomery County Councilmember

Holly RaveslootHHS Office of Community Services, Administration for Children and Families (ACS)

Tom Phillips, Healthy Buildings Research

1:35-2:15

Urban Heat Islands- A training session What is the urban heat island effect? How does the urban heat island effect impact different communities? What tools are available for communities to address their urban heat islands?

Moderators:

Hunter Jones, NOAA Climate Program Office

Victoria Ludwig, EPA Heat Island Reduction Program | Presentation

Presenters:

Chris David, American Forests | Presentation 

Joel Pannell, American Forests

Snigdha Garg, C40 | Presentation

2:15-2:30

Break

2:30-3:15

How do we keep our workers safe from heat?
Moderated panel sharing best practices and guidelines
How to keep workers indoor and outdoor workers safe before, during, and after heat events? How do we make sure employers are keeping their employees safe?

Moderator:

Dr. Augusta Williams, OSHA

Presenters:

Dr. Brenda Jacklitsch, HHS National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) | Presentation 

Andy Levinson, OSHA Directorate of Standards and Guidance | Presentation

Margaret Morrissey, American Industrial Hygiene Association & Korey Stringer Institute | Presentation 

Dr. Marysel Pagán Santana, Migrant Clinicians Network | Presentation

3:15-4:00

How do we recreate and engage in athletics safely outdoors?
Speakers share best practices for application and Q&A
How do we keep populations safe before, during and after heat events while engaging in recreational and athletic activities?

Moderator:

Kimberly McMahon, NOAA National Weather Service | Presentation 

Presenters:

Dr. Douglas Casa, Korey Stringer Institute | Presentation 

LTC David DeGroot, the Army Heat Center | Presentation 

4:00

A Vision for the Future: How Do We Become a Heat Resilient Nation?
What are all the things an ideal city should be doing? What are we doing in planning and preparedness? What does heat resilience look like?

4:00 – 4:30

Overview of Draft NIHHIS Strategic Plan 2022-2026
A step through the “story” for NIHHIS over the next five years and pathways to continued national success managing heat health risk and responses at all levels. Solicitation of audience feedback.

Juli Trtanj, NOAA Climate Program Office

Paul Schramm, HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Climate and Health Program

Kimberly McMahon, NOAA National Weather Service

Conference closeout, Live polling conference evaluation

NIHHIS is made possible by our participating agencies.

ASPR


CDC


EPA

FEMA


Department of Agriculture Forest Service


NIOSH

NOAA


OSHA


SAMHSA

 

 

 

 

NIHHIS Headquarters

Address: 1315 East-West Hwy, Suite 1100
Silver Spring, MD 20910

About Us

NIHHIS is an integrated information system that builds understanding of the problem of extreme heat, defines demand for climate services that enhance societal resilience, develops science-based products and services from a sustained climate science research program, and improves capacity, communication, and societal understanding of the problem in order to reduce morbidity and mortality due to extreme heat.  NIHHIS is a jointly developed system by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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