Search
Search
Participating agencies:   ASPR   |  CDC   |  EPA   |  FEMA   |  NIOSH   |  NOAA   |  OSHA   |  SAMHSA   

NIHHIS News

Event date: 5/19/2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Export event
Webinar: What happens when you go “Hyperlocal”? The legacy of inequitable heat exposure in US cities

Webinar: What happens when you go “Hyperlocal”? The legacy of inequitable heat exposure in US cities

This presentation will explore how increasing community engagement in both understanding and measuring urban heat using a novel participatory research campaign framework can lead to climate action efficacy in US cities.

OneNOAA Science Seminar Series

Title: What happens when you go “Hyperlocal”? The legacy of inequitable heat exposure in US cities

Presenters: Jeremy S. Hoffman, PhD, Chief Scientist, Science Museum of Virginia and Vivek Shandas, PhD, Professor of Climate Adaptation, Portland State University

When: Wednesday, May 19, 2021, 12-1pm ET

Sponsor(s): The National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS), co-led by the NOAA and the CDC, the NOAA Office of Education, and the NOAA Climate Program Office. 
Attendees interested in learning more about the impacts of extreme heat in urban areas, and how communities are dealing with them, are encouraged to sign up for the Heat Beat newsletter: https://lp.constantcontact.com/su/3DFc1Wx

Seminar Contacts: Hunter.Jones@noaa.gov and 
Carrie.McDougall@noaa.gov

View Recording:

recording

Accessibility: There will not be live captioning, but the recording will be posted to YouTube, which generates captions.

Abstract: The increasing intensity, duration, and frequency of heat waves due to human-caused climate change puts historically marginalized populations in a heightened state of precarity, as studies observe that “vulnerable” communities—especially those within urban areas in the United States—are disproportionately exposed to and affected by extreme heat. However, existing data on weather and climate variables are either too sparse or too coarse geographically to adequately describe risks to public health, infrastructure, and ecosystems at the local scale. This presentation will explore how increasing community engagement in both understanding and measuring urban heat using a novel participatory research campaign framework can lead to climate action efficacy in US cities. We suggest that such scientifically-defensible “hyperlocal” descriptions of place together with community participation directly serves NOAA’s mission while advancing environmental justice, community environmental literacy, and climate resilience more broadly.

About the Speakers:
Dr. Jeremy Hoffman is the Chief Scientist at the Science Museum of Virginia and Affiliate Faculty in the L. Douglas Wilder School and the Center for Environmental Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University. Dr. Hoffman specializes in connecting audiences to their changing planet through community science campaigns, interactive media, dynamic exhibitions, and hands-on experiences. His research has focused on assessing exposure to extreme heat in US urban areas and how this exposure relates to long-term planning policy and neighborhood design, and how this work can be leveraged to inspire community-driven climate action. Dr. Hoffman has served as a member of the Environment Committee for the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, a Science Communication Fellow for the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry and the Mitchell Hamline School of Law, and was recently honored as one of Style Weekly Richmond's Top 40 Under 40 and one of the Grist Magazine 50 Fixers for 2020.

Vivek Shandas: Dr. Vivek Shandas specializes in developing strategies for addressing the implications of climate change on cities. His teaching and research examine the intersection of exposure to climate-induced events, governance processes, and planning mechanisms. As an interdisciplinary scholar, Dr. Shandas studies the emergent characteristics that generate vulnerability among communities and infrastructure. Theoretically, he views cities as grand experiments that are socially constructed, and can vary in their capacities to adapt to changing social and ecological conditions. Empirically, Dr. Shandas examines the human and planetary forces that facilitate (or inhibit) collective response. As such the broad aims of his teaching and research are to identify threats to planetary habitation, and shape landscapes to improve urban environmental quality.

Slides & Recording: A PDF of the slides and the recording will be shared here: https://nihhis.cpo.noaa.gov/webinar

Subscribe to the OneNOAA Science Seminar Series weekly email: Send an email to OneNOAAscienceseminars-request@list.woc.noaa.gov with the word 'subscribe' in the subject or body. Visit the OneNOAA science seminar series website for more information.

 

*Cover image features volunteers in Jackson, MS in 2020 preparing for the campaign, courtesy of CAPA Strategies.

Print
2836

x
Upcoming Heat Season Awareness Social Media Campaign 5/16/2022 - 5/20/2022

Upcoming Heat Season Awareness Social Media Campaign

The NIHHIS Interagency Communications Group will be holding a heat season awareness social media campaign from May 16-20, 2022.

NOAA and Communities to Map Heat Inequities in 14 Communities and Two International Cities 10 May 2022

NOAA and Communities to Map Heat Inequities in 14 Communities and Two International Cities

Communities will use maps to inform efforts to combat extreme heat

CPO-funded American Planning Association Book: Planning  for Urban Heat Resilience 6 April 2022

CPO-funded American Planning Association Book: Planning for Urban Heat Resilience

This is the authoritative text for planners on the issue of urban heat island resilience, and it was funded by the Extreme Heat Risk Initiative of CPO.

NOAA's Applied Research Center for Dataset Development (ARC) Develops New Climate Dataset for Health Users 12 November 2021

NOAA's Applied Research Center for Dataset Development (ARC) Develops New Climate Dataset for Health Users

This dataset and tool are directly responsive to requests Dr. Spinrad heard from health practitioners at a NOAA Climate and Equity Roundtable event held in October 2021.

CPO Funds University of Vermont Extreme Heat Project 16 August 2021

CPO Funds University of Vermont Extreme Heat Project

The project will build on outcomes from NOAA's community-led field campaigns, which have helped engage the Burlington community and have produced critical hyperlocal temperature information. But cities, and Vermont's smaller cities and communities in particular, need more tools and resources to help them determine the most effective and efficient solutions tailored to their needs.  

RSS
12345678910Last

Events

NIHHIS is made possible by our participating agencies.

ASPR


CDC


EPA

FEMA


Department of Agriculture Forest Service


NIOSH

NOAA


OSHA


SAMHSA

 

NIHHIS Headquarters

Address: 1315 East-West Hwy, Suite 1100
Silver Spring, MD 20910

About Us

NIHHIS is an integrated information system that builds understanding of the problem of extreme heat, defines demand for climate services that enhance societal resilience, develops science-based products and services from a sustained climate science research program, and improves capacity, communication, and societal understanding of the problem in order to reduce morbidity and mortality due to extreme heat.  NIHHIS is a jointly developed system by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Back To Top