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NIHHIS NEWS & UPDATES

Launching a heat campaign? Start by setting your goals

Launching a heat campaign? Start by setting your goals

The purpose of the goal setting exercise is to begin brainstorming your overall goals and some key logistical components of your CAPA Heat Watch campaign. For instance, what are the most important goals of your potential partner organizations and volunteer networks? How do you envision leveraging your process and results to influence resiliency planning efforts in your region? Based on when hot, clear weather usually occurs as well as planned events in and around your community, what dates seem likely for training and mapping?

It may be helpful to track your progress on these points in a separate document, both to communicate with your team and compile progress notes in a single location. 

Who will be leading your core team?

Heat campaigns are designed to be a relatively easy lift compared to the impact of your returns. A local organizer will be key to recruiting relevant stakeholders, coordinating volunteers, communicating with CAPA, and receiving and returning equipment. 

Look for: A point person who has 15 - 25 hours available over the course of 2 - 3 months, ideally with existing relationships to relevant groups and familiarity with the basic concepts of urban heat and heat mapping. If not, no worries - knowledge about urban heat can be bolstered through CAPA’s informational materials and communication.

How do you envision using your heat campaign results? What audiences do you want to share them with?

Compile an inventory of completed, planned, or ongoing heat-related projects in your community. What plans, documents, and datasets already exist, and who are the key leaders involved in those projects? You’ll want to be sure to contact these leaders, to build on their results and gain their support for your efforts.

Look for: Climate adaptation plans, vulnerability and/ or risk assessments, collaborative initiatives, and relevant organizations. 

What other data are you interested in correlating with your heat data? How might the existing products or projects benefit from these data? Who else might be interested? 

Look for: Ongoing human health and heat initiatives, advocacy organizations relating to human vulnerability and health, organizations relating to tree cover/ canopy, sustainable/ adapted development initiatives, etc. 

How might public media, including TV, radio, and local newspapers help to advance your goals? We’ve found that the combination of weather-relevant visual information and the need for understanding differences in temperature across an urban area makes great media content and publicity.  

Look for: Press release templates, local organizations with press connections or their own networks and platforms, and opportunities for sharing media. Consider groups working with public health, climate action planning, urban forestry, and planning agencies. 

Which areas of your city do you want to be sure to include in your heat map? What is the total area you want to map?

Depending on how large an area your city covers, you may want to traverse the entire city or select a subsection of it. Can you cover areas that represent the full range of your demographics? Do particular problem areas or areas of interest come to mind? For which areas would your partner be interested in having data?

Look for: Development patterns, demographics, or geographic features in your proposed study area. Also consider areas targeted for particular initiatives or plans, or areas often discussed regarding equity, access, health, history, etc. 

When is your target campaign date range and who would you like to participate?

As you launch into engagement and volunteer recruitment, it is helpful to establish a target date range for conducting your campaign. 

Look for: Historical weather data that shows the time of highest temperatures in your region.  As you get closer to your target date, keep an eye on weather forecasts and potential interruptions such as cloud-cover or rain. Your ideal campaign date is a clear day in the top tenth percentile of temperature ranges for your area. 

Once this data range is established, you can begin reaching out to groups that have solid connections to a volunteer base. You will want to recruit at least two volunteers for each ten square mile area to be traversed, with a handful of back-ups as well. 

Look for: Community/environmental organizations with an established volunteer base; non-related groups that might benefit from exposure to accessible climate-related topics; friends, family, coworkers, or others looking to learn more about heat distribution, community science, and/ or local engagement in general.

With these points addressed, you will be well on your way to setting goals and conducting a successful, meaningful, and effective heat campaign! Keep an eye out for continued resources from the Heat Beat Newsletter, and feel free to reach out to info@capastrategies.com for further questions or concerns. 

 

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HEAT FORECASTS

 

 

Current Temperature Probability Outlook

  • 6-10 Day
  • 8-14 Day
  • Month
  • Three Month Outlook
  • Weeks 3-4 Experimental Outlook Temperature Probability
 

6-10 Day Temperature Probability Outlook Map

 

6-10 Day Temperature Probability Outlook

In this map, shaded areas show where average temperature has an increased chance of being warmer or cooler than usual. The darker the shading, the greater the chance for the indicated condition. White areas have equal chances for average temperatures that are below, near, or above the long-term average for the month.

Learn More

 

8-14 Day Temperature Probability Outlook Map

 

8-14 Day Temperature Probability Outlook

In this map, shaded areas show where average temperature has an increased chance of being warmer or cooler than usual. The darker the shading, the greater the chance for the indicated condition. White areas have equal chances for average temperatures that are below, near, or above the long-term average for the month.

Learn More

 

One Month Temperature Probability Outlook

 

One Month Temperature Probability Outlook

In this map, shaded areas show where average temperature has an increased chance of being warmer or cooler than usual. The darker the shading, the greater the chance for the indicated condition. White areas have equal chances for average temperatures that are below, near, or above the long-term average for the month.

Learn More

 

Three Month Temperature Outlook

 

Three Month Temperature Outlook

In this map, shaded areas show where average temperature has an increased chance of being warmer or cooler than usual. The darker the shading, the greater the chance for the indicated condition. White areas have equal chances for average temperatures that are below, near, or above the long-term average for the month.

Learn More

 

Three Month Temperature Outlook

 

Weeks 3-4 Experimental Outlook Temperature Probability

In this experimental map, shaded areas show where average temperature has an increased chance of being warmer or cooler than usual. The darker the shading, the greater the chance for the indicated condition. White areas have equal chances for average temperatures that are below, near, or above the long-term average for the month.

Learn More

Current Heat Index Outlook

  • 8-14 Day Over 95°F
  • 8-14 Day Over 90°F for 2 Days
 

8-14 Day Over 95°F

 

8-14 Day Over 95°F

This map shows the probability that the Average Heat Index (which takes into consideration temperature and humidity) will exceed a given value over for at least 2 days in the forecast window.

 

8-14 Day Over 90°F for 2 Days

 

8-14 Day Over 90°F for 2 Days

This map shows the probability that the Average Heat Index (which takes into consideration temperature and humidity) will exceed a given value over for at least 2 days in the forecast window.

Global Tropical Hazards at Weeks 1 & 2

 

8-14 Day over 95°F

 

8-14 Day Over 95°F

This map shows global tropical hazards predicted by NOAA for the upcoming two week period. Orange and blue coloring indicates the level of confidence that above or below normal temperatures, respectively, will develop in the forecast window.

Learn More

 

 

 

UNDERSTANDING THE HEALTH RISK OF EXTREME HEAT

 

Health Outcomes

Exposure to extreme heat can have many direct effects on human health (heat stroke, reduced labor productivity), as well as indirect effects (promoting air pollution and increasing asthma attacks, overloading power grids requiring rolling blackouts). Negative health outcomes occur if an individual is exposed to the hazard and has not sufficiently adapted to reduce sensitivity.


Sensitivity

Sensitivity

Inherent characteristics of a person that make them vulnerable to heat, such as preexisting conditions, age, or occupation. To understand how to protect these groups, see Populations of Concern.

 

Adaptability

Adaptability

The ability of a person to take measures to reduce exposure and sensitivity - for example, avoiding outdoor activities during the day or wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) that is designed to mitigate heat buildup. When exposure is not preventable, adaptability can help reduce the impact of heat.

 

Exposure

Exposure

The extent to which an individual is exposed to extreme heat. Going outside on a hot, humid day and working in direct sunlight constitutes high exposure, while reducing exposure includes avoidance of these activities. Sometimes exposure is not preventable.

Climate conditions

Climate conditions

Climate conditions that create a heat hazard include direct sunlight, low winds, high humidity, and high temperatures. When these conditions exist, a heat hazard is created.

 

 

 

AT-RISK GROUPS

Higher summertime temperatures are linked to an increased risk of illnesses and death, particularly among certain groups. Select a group below to learn more.

 

Children

Read More

Emergency Responders

Read More

Older Adults

Read More

Outdoor Workers

Read More

Athletes

Read More

Pets

Read More

 

 

 

 

 

HEAT WARNINGS IN YOUR AREA

View heat warnings in your area by state

 

 

 

STAYING SAFE DURING A HEAT WAVE

 

Key Safety Tips

  • Drink plenty of water; even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing liquid intake.
  • Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles.
  • Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.
  • Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.
  • Go to a designated public shelter if your home loses power during periods of extreme heat. Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.
  • Check the weather/listen to NOAA Weather Radio for critical updates from the National Weather Service (NWS).

 

 

Safety Tips If You Have To Go Outside

  • Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.
  • Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.
  • Protect face and head by wearing sunblock and a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Postpone outdoor games and activities.
  • Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.

Additional Safety Tips

  • Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.
  • Limit intake of alcoholic beverages.
  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.
  • Consider spending the warmest part of the day in public buildings such as libraries, schools, movie theaters, shopping malls, and other community facilities. Circulating air can cool the body by increasing the perspiration rate of evaporation.
  • Download the FEMA App for heat advisories and safety tips.
  • Text SHELTER + your ZIP code to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the nearest shelter in your area (example: shelter 12345).

Safety Tips Before Extreme Heat Arrives

  • To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.
  • Know those in your neighborhood who are older, young, sick or overweight. They are more likely to become victims of excessive heat and may need help.
  • Be aware that people living in urban areas may be at greater risk from the effects of a prolonged heat wave than are people living in rural areas.
  • Get trained in first aid to learn how to treat heat-related emergencies.

Tips to Prepare Your Home

  • Install window air conditioners snugly; insulate if necessary.
  • Check air-conditioning ducts for proper insulation.
  • Install temporary window reflectors (for use between windows and drapes), such as aluminum foil-covered cardboard, to reflect heat back outside.
  • Weather-strip doors and sills to keep cool air in.
  • Cover windows that receive morning or afternoon sun with drapes, shades, awnings, or louvers. (Outdoor awnings or louvers can reduce the heat that enters a home by up to 80 percent.)
  • Keep storm windows up all year.

Heat Related Terms

Familiarize yourself with these terms to help identify an extreme heat hazard:

  • Heat Wave - Prolonged period of excessive heat, often combined with excessive humidity.
  • Heat Index - A number in degrees Fahrenheit (F) that tells how hot it feels when relative humidity is added to the air temperature. Exposure to full sunshine can increase the heat index by 15 degrees.
  • Heat Cramps - Muscular pains and spasms due to heavy exertion. Although heat cramps are the least severe, they are often the first signal that the body is having trouble with the heat.
  • Heat Exhaustion - Typically occurs when people exercise heavily or work in a hot, humid place where body fluids are lost through heavy sweating. Blood flow to the skin increases, causing blood flow to decrease to the vital organs. This results in a form of mild shock. If not treated, the victim's condition will worsen. Body temperature will keep rising and the victim may suffer heat stroke.
  • Heat Stroke - A life-threatening condition. The victim's temperature control system, which produces sweating to cool the body, stops working. The body temperature can rise so high that brain damage and death may result if the body is not cooled quickly.
  • Sun Stroke - Another term for heat stroke.
  • Excessive Heat Watch - Conditions are favorable for an excessive heat event to meet or exceed local Excessive Heat Warning criteria in the next 24 to 72 hours.
  • Excessive Heat Warning - Heat Index values are forecast to meet or exceed locally defined warning criteria for at least 2 days (daytime highs=105-110° Fahrenheit).
  • Heat Advisory - Heat Index values are forecast to meet locally defined advisory criteria for 1 to 2 days (daytime highs=100-105° Fahrenheit).

 

 


 

NIHHIS is made possible by our participating agencies.

ASPR


CDC


EPA

FEMA


NIOSH


NOAA

OSHA


SAMHSA

 

NIHHIS Headquarters

Address: 1315 East-West Hwy, Suite 1100
Silver Spring, MD 20910

About Us

The NIHHIS is an integrated system that builds understanding of the problem of extreme heat, defines demand for climate services that enhance societal resilience, develops science-based products and services from a sustained climate science research program, and improves capacity, communication, and societal understanding of the problem in order to reduce morbidity and mortality due to extreme heat. The NIHHIS is a jointly developed system by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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